Michigan

 

Baiting and Feeding Prohibitions for Deer and Elk
BAITING AND FEEDING IS BANNED IN THE ENTIRE LOWER PENINSULA.
Exception: Hunters with Disabilities who meet specific requirements may use bait in areas where baiting is banned during the Liberty and Independence Hunts only. See pgs. 33 – 34.
Bait means a substance composed of grains, minerals, salt, fruits, vegetables, hay, or other food materials, which may lure, entice, or attract deer as an aid in hunting.
Feed means a substance composed of grain, mineral, salt, fruit, vegetable, hay, or other food material, that may attract deer or elk for any reason other than hunting.
NOTE: You can use food-scented materials- whether composed of natural or synthetic materials- made inaccessible for consumption by deer and placed in a manner to prohibit physical contact with deer. (Examples: oil based attractants, scented wicks, etc.) Other urine-based scents are legal, such as mock scrapes, drag ropes, wicks, etc. provided these products have the Archery Trade Association (ATA) symbol marked on the packaging or bottle.
Food plots — naturally occurring foods, standing agricultural crops, or food placed as a result of using normal agricultural practices are not considered to be bait or feed. Constructing or maintaining any food plot or any artificial garden to attract wildlife on public land is prohibited.
Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Management Zone
The CWD Management Zone includes Barry, Calhoun, Clinton, Eaton, Gratiot, Hillsdale, Ingham, Ionia, Isabella, Jackson, Kent, Lenawee, Mecosta, Midland, Montcalm, Muskegon, Newaygo, Ottawa, and Shiawassee counties.
(pg 44)

Core CWD Surveillance Area
Core CWD Surveillance Area is that area of Delta, Dickinson, and Menominee counties bounded by a line beginning in Dickinson county at the junction of the centerline of highway US-141 and highway US-2 (shared road segment) with the centerline of the Menominee river (a coincident line with the county boundary and the state boundary with Wisconsin) located northwest of the city of Iron Mountain, then westerly (about 1 mile) along the centerline on US-141/ US-2 to the intersection with state highway M-95, northerly on M-95 to highway M-69 near the town of Randville, southeasterly on M-69 into Delta county to highway US-41 and highway US-2 (shared road segment) located west of the town of Bark River, southwesterly and westerly on US-41/US-2 into Menominee county where US-41 and US-2 diverge (US-41 heads southerly and US-2 heads westerly) near the town of Powers, continue on US-41 southerly into the town of Carney to county road G-18, westerly on G-18 to the junction of G-18 with the centerline of the Menominee river and the county/state boundary, northerly and northwesterly upstream along the Menominee river and county/state boundary, into Dickinson county along that river-centerline/county/state boundary to the point of beginning.

  • No antler point restrictions on the deer license or deer combo license regular and restricted tag.
  • Antlerless deer may be harvested during the archery season with a deer or deer combo license.
  • Crossbows are allowed during the late archery season.
  • Baiting and Feeding is banned.
    • Exception: Hunters with Disabilities who meet specific requirements may use bait in areas where baiting is banned during the Liberty and Independence Hunts only. See pgs. 33–34.
      (pg 49)

In the rest of the Upper Peninsula, the following baiting regulations apply:

  • Baiting may occur only from Sept. 15 - Jan. 1.
  • Bait volume at any hunting site cannot exceed two gallons. Bait dispersal must be over a minimum 10-foot by 10-foot area.
  • Bait must be scattered directly on the ground. It can be scattered by any means, including mechanical spin-cast feeders, provided that the spin-cast feeder does not distribute more than the maximum volume allowed.
  • To minimize exposure of deer to diseases that may be present, the DNR recommends not placing bait or feed repeatedly at the same point on the ground and only baiting when actively hunting.


In the rest of the Upper Peninsula, the following feeding rules apply:

  • Feed volume at any residence cannot exceed two gallons.
  • Feed may be no more than 100 yards from a residence on land owned or possessed by that person.
  • Feed must be scattered on the ground. It can be scattered by any means, including mechanical spin-cast feeders, provided that the spin-cast feeder does not distribute more than the maximum volume allowed.
  • Feed must be at least 100 yards from any area accessible to cattle, goats, sheep, new world camelids, bison, swine, horses, or captive cervidae.
    (pg 51)

 

Source
Phone: 517-373-2329


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